Profiles

Home | Profile | Frank Shostak
  • shostak_Frank2013.jpg

Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics NewsletterMises Daily Article

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, master's degree from Witwatersrand University and PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University, and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

Are Expectations the Driving Force Behind Business Cycles?

Booms and BustsBusiness Cycles

Blog07/22/2019

Even if business people learn to expect easy-money caused bubbles and busts - this would still not prevent the formation of a boom-bust cycle. 

Read More

The Illusion of the Keynesian Multiplier

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog07/15/2019

Not only will easy-money policy not increase production, it will impoverish us by inflating away real wealth.

Read More

When Will the Stock Market Respond to 2016's Liquidity Collapse?

Financial MarketsMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog07/08/2019

 A major factor that can explain the apparent contradiction between weakening so-called fundamentals of today — and the stock market's continued march upward — is changes in monetary liquidity.

Read More

Low Price Inflation Means the Fed Will Retreat to Low Rates and Easy Money

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog07/01/2019

Given that Fed policymakers are of the view that a decline in the annual growth of prices is bad for the economy they are most likely to embark on very easy monetary policy in near future.

Read More

Central Banks Aren't Really In Control of Interest Rates

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog06/22/2019

The central bank can try to manipulate the interest rate to whatever level it desires. However, it cannot exercise control over the underlying interest rates as dictated by people’s time preferences.

Read More
Shield icon audience